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Ministry of Information Industry eases new rules on online video and audio sharing

first_img Help by sharing this information April 27, 2021 Find out more ChinaAsia – Pacific June 2, 2021 Find out more News Latest update (12.09.08)The government has relaxed new rules that took effect on 31 January making it a requirement to have a government permit in order to distribute audio and video files online and restricting the right to distribute such files to entities that are fully or partially state-owned. The Ministry of Information Industry said today that companies that were already putting audio and video content online before the regulations were issued would be able to be licensed and continue operating regardless of whether they comply with the new rules, but audio and video-sharing sites created after 31 January would have to comply.“These measures continue to pose a threat to free expression because the government has given no indication as to the status of audio and video files produced by amateur bloggers,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Will Chinese bloggers be able to post the videos or sound tracks they recorded? There is absolutely no certainty of this.”Control of online audiovisual content is very strict in China. A report issued by Reporters Without Borders in October shows that Internet surveillance and control uses a subtle mix of filtering, cyber-police and propaganda. There are five government entities that monitor the Internet and issue instructions to websites about the news they can report.Download the full report RSF_en China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison ChinaAsia – Pacific News Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes ————————-01.02 – Government urged to rescind new rules on distributing audio and video files online Reporters Without Borders is concerned about new regulations governing the online distribution of audio and video files that took effect yesterday. Bloggers and website owners must now obtain a government permit before distributing audio and video files. Any website that does not have a licence or violates the new rules in any other way could have its Internet access cut.Announced at the end of last year, the new rules have caused an outcry in China and in the international blogosphere. For a website to be granted a licence, the first criteria is to be fully or partially state-owned. Chen Jiachun, the deputy director of the Ministry of Information Industry’s Telecom Administration Bureau, had said on 16 January that the government intended to “reconsider.”“This is a disproportionate and highly questionable measure aimed at maintaining control over content circulating on the Internet,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We call on Chen Jiachun to keep her promise and to refrain from disrupting free expression more than it already is. This law puts news and information in danger because ISPs will have to work closely with the censors to ensure that the content on their sites is approved by the government so that their Internet access is not cut.”Control of online audiovisual content is already very strict in China. A report issued by Reporters Without Borders last October shows that Internet surveillance and control uses a subtle mix of filtering, cyber-police and propaganda. There are five government entities that monitor the Internet and issue instructions to websites in order to control the news they report.Download the full report March 12, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on China February 5, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Ministry of Information Industry eases new rules on online video and audio sharing News to go further Receive email alerts News China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Organisation last_img

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